Categories
investigative journalism

P8 and M4: Assess and Analyze Feedback

  1. Formative Peer Feedback

Points that were made to me, either by my tutor or peers, included:

  • To ensure that I was careful with my wording. During presenting, I made my writing confusing by using words such as “responsible”, but not stating the context. The confusion centered around the intention of the word – was I calling young people responsible in a positive or negative way?
  • During an explanation of a point surrounding age categories, the sentence became long and hard to follow. This was due to my writing not being sharp, or using short, punchy sentences.
  • To correct a slide based on primary and secondary research – the meaning of this prompt had been misinterpreted by myself. This intended meaning was explained to me by my tutor once this error was spotted.
  • During my presentation, I mentioned about “ensuring my facts were accurate”, yet did not specify the verification process. After this was brought to my attention, I specified verified websites used for my research.

Summative Feedback

Points that were made to me during my summative feedback by journalist Mick Clifford included:

  • That one of the most important ways to show my research regarding young people being targeted for the spread of Covid-19 is to compare this with different age groups.
  • To provide examples of how young people are being blamed, either in the media or from NPHET briefings.
  • Young people are at a stage of life where socializing is key, which also feeds into my thesis. This is another important element to my piece.
  • My comparison involving how young people in Northern Ireland have been more heavily laid off work as opposed to older people was praised, giving me confidence in my work.
  • Overall, my piece was said to be very well-rounded and well put-together.

2. If I were to do anything differently in my piece after the formative feedback, it would include:

  • Taking more care in my wording of sentences, in order to ensure my work flow clearly and makes sense to the reader without having to reread it.
  • Using shorter, punchier sentences to grab the readers attention
  • Ensuring I have read the task given to me clearly, so I hit all learning outcomes and do not miss out on an achievable grade.
  • Use a verification process while gathering facts, in order to ensure their reliability. This includes using trust-worthy sources for figures and statistics, such as CSO.

If I were to do anything differently in my piece after the summative feedback, it would include:

  • Being specific when using age group comparisons, as this highlights the prompt of my piece and emphasizes the points I am making.
  • Providing examples of young people being blamed, although I believe I carried this out in my piece. However, I could have included more.
  • Emphasizing further on the job loss rates for young people – perhaps even making this a subheading and delving deeper into the topic.
Categories
individual project

D1 Story Planning

Story Pt. 1

Citizen Journalism circulates around overcoming adversity.

I have chosen the method of researching case studies in my topic. They capture the reality of citizen journalism’s impact on media reliability, as they are stories of real people and go further than a figure or a statistic. More importantly, they highlight the need for change. When traditional journalism goes quiet, citizen journalism gets louder – my chosen case studies are prime instances of this.

Q: How does citizen journalism highlight breaches of human rights?

Emma Murphy Fights Back

In 2015, Emma Murphy (26) from Santry, Dublin sat down at the bottom of her stairs with a fresh black eye from her partner.

Her two young children could be seen playing in the background. After much deliberation, she began to record herself speaking on her situation of domestic violence.

She described her partner’s infiedlity, her confrontation and his violent response. “He hit me…” She tells the camera, wiping her tears, “It wasn’t the first time.” In the video she tells how the man she was in a relationship with punched her and “split her head open” in previous episodes of violence. – All of this can be seen in the primary source of Emma Murphy speaking. Article also written by Conor Feehan, The Independent

Q: With such a powerful message, how did this effect the life’s of other survivors of domestic abuse?

When Ms Murphy uploaded the video to her Facebook account, her intention was to share her story with “a few close friends and family”. She had no idea that sharing this piece of citizen journalism would change her life and hundreds of other’s forever. She spoke in a TedTalk about her experience, where she said “Without (Facebook) to voice my story, I would still be in that very unhapy place where I wished I was dead.”

The video has been viewed over 10 million times, encouraging countless other domestic abuse survivors to come forward with their story.​ – Be specific with numbers; where has video been viewed?

Since uploading the video, Ms Murphy has participated in further work in order to help other people in similar situations.

She spoke in a TedExTalk about her experience, where she said “Without (Facebook) to voice my story, I would still be in that very unhappy place where I wished I was dead.” – Repeat of verification; link to above. Find further quotes from video to add to piece.

She also made a documentary “Emma Murphy Fights Back” to speak to other suriviors, and continues to use her platform to raise awareness of Domestic Abuse. – Further detail into documentary content, and add ways in which she uses her platform to raise awareness.

Q: Can you clearly outline what has changed, such as laws etc?

https://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/dublin-domestic-abuse-victim-emma-12574066

#StandWithSophie

On 2nd September 2020, a video began to circulate of a 9 year old girl from Texas named Sophie refusing to go home with her mother and stepfather. 

 Screaming in tears, Sophie accuses her stepfather and his friends of sexual assault.​

What were some direct quotes of Sophie? (Less gruesome.)

Sharing the video led to a GoFundMe page being set up for Sophie, raising $210,622 out of a $25,000 target. As well as this, full custody has been awarded of Sophie and her two brothers to her biological father.​ – I will explore deeper into the impacts of this case, such as what happened to her mother and step-father, what the reach of the video was like and who else came forward.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/12635924/stand-with-sophie-viral-video-abuse/

The Murder of George Floyd – Enough is Enough

George Floyd was a 46 year old father of five. He lived in Minneaplois, Minnesota and was a proud African-American. – Verify how I know he was “proud” – On May 25th, officers responded to a report of a “forgery in progress”, after Floyd bought a packet of cigarettes. It was believed he used a fake $20 bill. ​

While arresting him, officers pulled Floyd from his car, causing him to fall to the ground. He was handcuffed. Video evidence taken by a bystander shows Floyd losing consciousness as an officer knelt on his neck, and he was pronounced dead an hour later.

Police brutality against people of colour is nothing society has not seen before, but it was this video surfacing online that sparked a civil rights movement globally. The gruesomeness and obvious hatred shown within the video was something that people could no longer turn a blind eye to – it was time for change.​

Floyd’s death led to protests with one message in common – Black Lives Matter. Cities in 50 countires held demonstrations. In the UK and US, video footage has surfaced of historical monuments with links to slavery being vandalised has surfaced. The statue of Edward Colston, who was involved in the Atlantic slave trade, was thrown into the harbour in protest of white privilege. In US, statues of Christopher Columbus have been defaced or taken down. Society has become more attentive to racially insensitive people and shows. Public figures such as Keith Lemon have apologized for their use of “black face”, explaining how their intention of doing so was for comedic purposes and not to insult or offend anyone. Little Britain and Come Fly with Me, shows from eras of different humor, have been removed off Netflix.

How did this combat mainstresam traditional news of Covid? Particularly relating to protests, lack of social distancing, cases afterwards etc

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/minneapolis-police-george-floyd-died-officer-kneeling-neck-arrest/

How it all comes together

An observation I made was how emotionally impacted people are by citizen journalism as opposed to traditional journalism. This can be seen in my case studies I have chosen to explore – a global outcry occurred for all three situations of three individual people. From sums of money being donated, to protests happening all around the world, to people having the courage to change their own lifes forever, citizen journalism hits a nerve that traditional journalism fails to. Regarding media reliability, the more that these cases blow up, the more evidence appears of injustice occuring.

Categories
investigative journalism

Young People and Covid-19: Are we to Blame?

man in gray dress shirt and blue denim jeans walking on sidewalk during daytime
PC: Kevin Grieve

Stereotype/blame

The last thing anyone wants to hear is that they are to blame for a global pandemic. For young people, we hear this regularly.

Between the media hounding us, to boomers tutting and shaking their heads while walking past, the stereotype is everywhere. Dr. Ronan Glynn, chief medical officer, acknowledged this before we re-entered phase 5 in October. He said:

Ireland has developed a “blame culture” which is now focused on young people.”

One reason for this is the public growing “tired and fatigued” of the pandemic. The result of this has led to finger pointing, with no real knowledge of the reality surrounding them.

What’s caught my attention, is that while these older people are pointing fingers, they’re rarely innocent themselves. I have experienced those cussing out a neighbor throwing a seventeenth birthday “party” of eight friends, yet organizing a communion “get-together” for thirty people in their back garden.

When cases began to spike during late August, Dublin consultant Laura Durcan spoke on this during RTE’s Today show with Claire Byrne. She said: “We need to think about brunches, lunches, dinner parties and communions too. We have to be able to personalise the message and modify our behaviour.”

On a separate interview on the Today show, minister for Health Simon Harris contrasted video footage released of a group of young people drinking and partying in the streets of Killarney, Co. Kerry, with the “Golfgate” scandal involving past and present members of parliament. Goflgate is the name given to the two-day event held by the Oireachtas Golf Society, and attended in the Station House Hotel in Clifden. 82 people partook in the event, involving top politicians. These included Minister for Agriculture, Fianna Fáil’s Dara Calleary, Supreme Court Judge Seamus Woulfe and EU Commissioner Phil Hogan.

This event took place the day after new restrictions were put in place late August, stating that no more than six people allowed to gather indoors, and 15 outdoors.

“There were no students in Clifden.” Said the Minister, when comparing the different age groups, and said there will always be people “who do stupid things.”

Restriction Breakers/Anti-Mask

man in black and red hoodie standing in front of people
PC: Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona

As of time of writing in October 2020, the Covid-19 case figures categorized by age from the month previous were as followed:

Covid-19 Cases – September 2020 – CSO

15 – 24: 2,008

25 – 44: 2,820

45-64: 1,976

Evidently, the virus is spreading amongst young people. And like Minister Simon Harris said, there will always be people who “do stupid things”, but these people could be young or old. So if young people aren’t to blame, the question is: where are these high figures coming from?

On 2 November 2020, I contacted An Garda Siochana to ask a representative to speak to me about what the situation has been like regarding dealing with complaints over young people breaking restrictions. They said:

“It’s safe to say, the Irish Public and young people have been highly compliant during the restrictions. This has stayed consistent over the past number of months.”

“Throughout the Covid response Gardai have used the 4E’s approach of engage, educate and encourage, and only where provided for and as a last resort, enforcement.”

A group of people who openly don’t support the government guidelines are commonly known as “anti-maskers”. This refers to individuals who do not believe in the benefits for themselves and those around them of wearing fabric face masks to cover their nose and mouth. These people are not refusing to wear them due to being medically exempt – they are either in denial of the virus, want to feel “in control” of what they do, or are filled with conspiracy theories about the government.

Whatever the reason, many of these people are angry about it. Their anger has driven them to a point of mass anti-mask protests, with thousands attending. These protests include banners expressing their beliefs (some photographed include “COVID-19 HOAX” and “NO TO MASKS; NO TO SOCIAL DISTANCING; NO TO COVID TESTING; NO TO COVID VACCINE; YES TO LIFE!”). These protests don’t include the wearing of face-masks or standing 6 feet apart.

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization recommend cloth masks for the general public, and most people have become accustomed to wearing one. Your face and mouth being uncovered means that the droplets spreading will not be caught within a mask if not wearing one, causing a higher spread of the virus.

So how many of these people refusing to take precautions are young people?

I contacted two organizations which organize these protests, Yellow Vest Ireland and Health Freedom Ireland. Despite reaching out on multiple occasions for a comment on this, neither of them responded as of time of writing.

I turned to video footage of these mass protests to see what I could find. One video I found, dated 12 September 2020, was estimated at having 1,500-2,000 attendants. The protest was organized by Yellow Vest Ireland. Video evidence shows no visible signs of young people participating, apart from children holding their parents hands or babies in strollers, who are too young to have a fully-formed opinion.

Schools

people sitting on chairs inside room
PC: Andy Falconer


When primary and secondary schools reopened this year late August/early September, after being closed nationwide since March 13th, this was a major cause for concern regarding case spikes.

Safety precautions were put in place for the return of students. For secondary schools, these include:

  • Face coverings to be worn at all times
  • Students sitting at socially distanced desks
  • Desks to be sanitized before and after use
  • No lockers or indoor canteens in use.
  • Increased ventilation (windows must be kept open at all times)

As cases began to spike during September, leading to the closure of restaurants and pubs serving food for the second time, people began to question where these cases were coming from. A section for school outbreaks is not included in the daily figures.

I sourced these statistics from Martina Broe, who runs a Twitter account dedicated to providing parents with information . These have been approved by the HSE. As of time of writing (30 November 2020) there has been:

  • 806 cases in Primary schools, with 478 school impacted (14.8%)
  • 793 cases in Secondary schools, with 378 schools impacted (52.0%)

Young people have no say when it comes to mixing in these situations, apart from students at third level who have majorly carried out their education this year online, apart from those partaking in practical work which requires in-person attendance.

I spoke to Aoife McLysaght, the Trinity College Professor of Genetics, who is unhappy that the blame is being cast amongst young people.

“As I work in Trinity, I have lots of interaction with that young age group. All of my students, from what I have seen, have been really good regarding complacency. Of course, they wish things didn’t have to be like this. They have been very careful – I work in the science labs, so they have those, but what they do on campus has been brought back to a total minimum.”

Public Transport

blue and black bus seats
PC: Lukas Medvedevas


Over the course of the pandemic, we as a nation have been advised not to take public transport unless it’s absolutely necessary. This is due to:

  • Decreased capacity on buses and trains.
  • Lack of frequent sanitization.
  • Essential workers being prioritized in order to get to and from work.

According to The Department of Transport, Oxford and Bristol Universities, a government-backed study reveals under a third of those aged 17-20 hold a driving license.

The likelihood of young people being able to afford transport of their own, especially with the financial strain lockdown’s have put on the country, is unlikely. Lockdown’s have also led to many job losses, the hospitality sector targeted in particular.

The overall minimum cost of learning to drive and getting a 10 year driving license is typically around 690 euro. This does not include any lessons outside of the 12-hour lessons you are required to take, or any insurance premiums which would be necessary if you wanted to drive your own car or a family car.

This means that young people are left with no choice but to compromise themselves in less government-abiding conditions by taking public transport when commuting, unless they are at a financial advantage and can afford to learn how to drive.

Long term effects for young people

woman leaning on door looking outside
PC: Kinga Cichewicz


In the illuminating My World Survey, published by UCD and Jigsaw in November 2019, young people were questioned about the parts of their lives that stressed them out to think about the most.

Following exams and finance, “the future” was among the top three stress providers for young adults. This was just months before our lives around us would change in all three of these aspects.

Due to school closures, the class of 2020 had no “real” leaving cert – only an estimated grade provided by their teachers and approved by the state. This was deemed unfair by many students, as their grades may well have been higher if sitting the exam in June had went ahead. Not to mention the once-in-a-lifetime experiences missed – no “last day”, no graduation, no debs.

As mentioned previously, the hospitality sector being impacted has led to financial struggles for young people employed by it. In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that 45% of under-25s have been laid off work since the start of the crisis, compared to 25%-30% for older age groups.

Young people’s lifelong dreams have been obliterated by the pandemic. Some had plans of studying abroad this year once finishing their school studies, which now cannot go ahead due to safety measures.

I speak for young people when I say, the last thing we want is for this pandemic to continue. We too are being impacted by this. Although we might not take a hit physically, we’re taking it mentally. According to the CSO, people aged 18-34 have the highest rates of those who are nervous, downhearted, depressed and lonely due to the virus. Yet, we all get targeted under the same category of being “selfish“, “inconsiderate” and “putting lives at risk“. Yes, there are people “who do stupid things.” But that statement is applied for anyone, no matter the age.

Sources:

Coronavirus in Ireland: Blame culture is now targeting young people, says Ronan Glynn | Ireland | The Times

Covid-19: Dublin doctor warns against blaming young people for rising cases (irishexaminer.com)

What is golfgate? Ireland’s political scandal explained | The Irish Post

Harris and HSE chief warn against blaming young people for spread of Covid-19 (breakingnews.ie)

COVID-19 Deaths and Cases Statistics – CSO – Central Statistics Office

What does antimask mean? (definitions.net)

The Psychology Behind Why Some People Refuse To Wear Face Masks | HuffPost Life

Face Coverings and Masks (idsociety.org)

Thousands march through Dublin to protest face mask wearing (irishtimes.com)

Safety tips for returning to school during COVID-19 – Mayo Clinic

(2) Martina B #TogetherWeStandForOurSchools (@MartinaBroe1) / Twitter

Number of young adults with driving licences falls by 40 per cent | Auto Express

Covid-19 and the Irish Hospitality Sector: Impact and Options (pwc.ie)

Cost of Learning to Drive in Ireland – Money Guide Ireland

Special Report: Ireland’s young people ‘fear the future more than anything’ amid the ongoing Covid-19 crisis (irishexaminer.com)

Coronavirus: Young people ‘face trap of world without work’ – BBC News

Social Impact of COVID-19 by Age Group April 2020 – CSO – Central Statistics Office

Categories
individual project

Citizen Journalism: “We Can’t Take This Lying Down.”

people having rally in the middle of road
PC: Joël de Vriend

Anyone has the power to make a change for what’s right, no matter who you are. Abbie Alwell explores this through the impacts of three individual situations.

When traditional journalism goes quiet, citizen journalism gets loud. As cliché as this sounds, the most topical issues we speak on have became relevant due to their circulation on social media. Ordinary people with ordinary mobile phones and ordinary social media accounts – their reporting resonates with the public more than an ordinary newsroom ever could.

The reason for this is different for everyone. You might identify with these stories on a personal level, stressing on the emotional aspect of it. You might be struck by the familiarity of those who’s story is broadcasted online (“They’re just like me. That could have been me.”) . Or, you find a shaky camera, poor lighting and one strong message radiating from it too raw to scroll past (like myself.)

I have chosen the method of researching case studies in my topic, as three individual people stood out to me. I’d heard of their names countless times, be it on social media or in everyday conversations, and wondered to myself, “Where did it go from there?”. They capture the reality of citizen journalism’s impact on media reliability, as they are stories of real people and go further than a figure or a statistic. More importantly, they highlight the need for change.

Emma Murphy Fights Back

silhouette of personr
PC: Miguel Bruna

In 2015, Emma Murphy sat at the bottom of her stairs. Her two young children played in the background. Emma had a black eye. Hesitantly, she began to record herself: “He hit me…,” she tells the camera, holding back tears, “…it wasn’t the first time.”

“He” refers to her partner at the time, the father of her children.

When Ms Murphy uploaded the video to her Facebook account, the video gained over 10 million views. She had no idea that sharing this piece of citizen journalism would change her life and the lives of hundreds of others.

Ms Murphy described to me the impacts of posting such a video: “My life has changed for the better since uploading my video. I now work full time in Domestic Violence which I feel I was meant to do. I speak to women every day about their experiences and support them through their journey. I am a happier and more confident woman since posting the video.”

Her partner had manipulated her into thinking that this behavior was acceptable, alongside of subjecting her to “mental torture” by calling her “paranoid” and “insecure” about his affair.

“Since my video went viral it has opened the door and began the conversation of abuse. People now talk about this more openly. We now even have the new coercive control bill that is now a criminal offence.”

On 2 January 2019, coercive control became a criminal offense in Ireland. Coercive control is psychological abuse in relationships that causes anxiety of physical violence. This takes over the victims life, resulting in a toxic pattern of humiliation and intimidation in fear of being subjected to physical or psychological abuse. It is included in the Domestic Violence Act, which explains the legal protections and help offered to domestic abuse victims.

Signs of coercive control can start out as simple as your partner making fun of issues they are aware you feel sensitive towards. Things can escalate quickly from this once confrontation occurs. Director of Women’s Aid Margaret Martin spoke on this on Today with Miriam O’Callaghan.  She said: “I think it’s really interesting that this sort of abuse has been recognized because the thing about domestic violence is it is very much a pattern of different behaviors and very much repeated behaviors, and most crimes are about one single incident of assault, [like] burglary etc.”

Murphy continued to speak on the impacts of her video: “We have the government speaking about domestic violence more, more awareness campaigns. People have realized that domestic violence happens every day and that it is real. People now take domestic violence a bit more seriously as they now see the effects it has on families. I believe people are more open-minded now, and the conversation is more open.” 

#EndRevengePorn

woman in yellow and pink floral dress
PC: Mika Baumeister

In November of this year, the lives of thousands of Irish women were impacted by a server on a US-based chat app called Discord. This was found to be hosting intimate images of Irish women and underage girls. These images were being shared amongst 500+ men across the country, with files as specific as the girls hair color, body type and ages.

When news of the leak arose, Megan J Renee, one of the people working in spreading awareness on this, has been actively using her Twitter and Instagram accounts to do so. A victim of image based sexual abuse, Megan has posted screenshots taken directly from the server of the titles of files. One section consists of “Teen 1/Teen 2/Teen 3/Teen 4”. Another states “6.23 TB folder”, containing 143,573 files. One was titled “16yo.”

The assumption online was that these girls deserved to be protected. The assumption online was that these images being uploaded without their consent will have consequences for uploaders. The assumption online was that justice will be served. This is not the case.

There is no law protecting these girls unless there is proof that the images include under 18’s.

That week, the people of Ireland pulled together online in order to help those working in raising awareness. A petition started by Megan on Change.org 5 months beforehand circulated to “Make revenge porn a criminal offense in Ireland.” At time of writing, this petition has 75,231 signatures. Written by Megan, the petition’s description states:

“Many women in Ireland are constantly targeted and disproportionately affected by this resulting in severe repercussions, leading in some cases to suicide. Girls affected by image-based sexual abuse are often also victims of severe cyber-bullying and job losses because of this.

“I am publicly asking the Irish government for the Harassment, Harmful Communications and Related Offences Bill be signed into Irish law including that those guilty be added to the sex offenders register and face a criminal conviction which could see those convicted jailed for up to 7 years.”

People sharing their thoughts and experiences surrounding revenge porn was successful in the sense that bringing in a protection law was discussed through TDs. Despite this issue being brought before the Dail on multiple occasions, the Gardai have currently failed to implement due to them finding “no actaul complaint of image-based sexual abuse”.

We cannot stop fighting for these girls, and Megan has not stopped writing on social media about this since the rejection, urging people to continue reporting to the Gardai if their images have been included in the leak.

“We can’t take this lying down.”

The Murder of George Floyd – Enough is Enough

people holding a white and black signage during daytime
PC: Koshu Kunii

George Floyd was a 46 year old African-American father of five. He lived in Minneaplois, Minnesota. On May 25th, officers responded to a report of a “forgery in progress, after Floyd bought a packet of cigarettes. It was believed he used a fake $20 bill. ​

While arresting him, officers pulled Floyd from his car, causing him to fall to the ground. He was handcuffed. Video evidence taken by a bystander shows Floyd losing consciousness as officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck, and he was pronounced dead an hour later.

Police brutality against people of color has been seen before, but it was this video surfacing online that sparked a civil rights movement globally. The gruesomeness and obvious hatred shown within the video was something that people could no longer turn a blind eye to – it was time for change.​

Floyd’s death led to protests with one message in common – Black Lives Matter. Cities in 50 countries held demonstrations. 93% of these protests in the US were peaceful. Some became violent. Police began to fail to differentiate between the two. Largely peaceful protests commenced throughout Belarus, and were shut down by police force. Michelle Bachelet, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, said:

“People have the right to speak up and express dissent, even more in the context of elections, when democratic freedoms should be upheld, not suppressed.”

In the UK and US, video footage has surfaced of historical monuments with links to slavery being vandalized. Since Floyd’s death, 38 statues in the US have been destroyed or toppled, such as monuments of Don Juan de Onate, John Breckenridge Castleman and Edward Carmack.

George Floyd’s memorial fund has reached $2,355,320 out of an updated $2,500,000 goal, and has become the most donated GoFundMe page to exist. The money of this fund is to assist in providing mental and grief counseling for George Floyd’s youngest child Gianna, to help cover court proceedings costs, and to help the family in paying for their child’s education.

Society has become more attentive to racially insensitive people and shows. Public figures such as Keith Lemon have apologized for their use of “black face”, explaining how their intention of doing so was for comedic purposes and not to insult or offend anyone. Little Britain and Come Fly with Me, shows from eras of different humor, have been removed off Netflix.

How It All Comes Together

An observation I made was how emotionally impacted people are by citizen journalism as opposed to traditional journalism. This can be seen in my case studies I have chosen to explore – a global outcry occurred for all three situations, contrasting one another. From petitions being signed, to protests happening all around the world, to people having the courage to change their own lives forever, citizen journalism hits a nerve that traditional journalism fails to. The voice of the people knows no boundaries.

Sources

If you’ve made it this far, be sure to drop a follow on my twitter @abbiealwelljou1.

Big thanks to Emma Murphy for speaking to me on her experiences for this piece. You can catch her on her instagram @emma_murphy_fitness, or her twitter @enmmamurphy.

Dublin domestic abuse victim Emma Murphy whose video went viral has new RTE documentary to help victims – Irish Mirror Online

Emma Murphy – YouTube

What is Coercive Control and why is it now a legal offence? (rte.ie)

Coercive control – Womens Aid

Discord to co-operate with Gardai in hunt for 500 Irish men who downloaded leaked nude images – Irish Mirror Online

(4) Megan (@meganjrenee) / Twitter

Garda Commissioner says 10,000 images examined but no formal complaints of image-based abuse made (thejournal.ie)

Petition · Irish Justice Department: Make revenge porn a criminal offence in Ireland · Change.org

Calls for legislation on image-based sexual abuse (irishexaminer.com)

Who was George Floyd and why was he arrested by Minneapolis police? – The Sun

Home – Black Lives Matter

93% of Black Lives Matter Protests Have Been Peaceful: Report | Time

Belarus: UN rights chief condemns violence against protesters, calls for grievances to be heard | | UN News

Statues Beheaded, Torn Down In US And UK Amid Black Lives Matter Protests (buzzfeednews.com)

A list of the statues across the US toppled, vandalized or officially removed amid protests | TheHill

Fundraiser by Tiffany Lee : OFFICIAL Gianna Floyd Fund (George Floyd’s child) (gofundme.com)

George Floyd: 10 things that have changed since his death – BBC News

Categories
investigative journalism

P1 Secondary Research

1. Why blaming young people for the Covid-19 spike could backfire – Podcast by Stephen Reicher and Anushka Asthana, The Guardian (Blame)

2. Report: Young People and Covid – Siofra Mulqueen, Newstalk (Intro?)

3. It’s estimated that 45% of under-25s have been furloughed or laid off since the start of the crisis, compared to 25%-30% for older age groups – http://www.bbccom (NI) – not spreading in workplace and made aware of how real virus is (Pandemic Repercussions)

4. Of the 3,353 cases recorded national between September 7 and 20, 727 of those cases were in the age group. That’s 21.68% of all cases in Ireland. (as of September 22nd 2020) – DublinLive.ie (Health)

5. Younger people should be treated as part of the solution when it comes to stopping the spread of Covid-19 rather than the problem, according to experts and youth leaders. (Blame/Pandemic Repercussions)

Trinity College Dublin (TCD) professor of genetics Aoife McLysaght said her experience with students was that they display great self-awareness about Covid-19. – Independent.ie (Blame)

6. Minister Harris said there would always be people “who do stupid things” in reference to the scenes of revelry, but added that we should not lose sight of the fact that the majority of people are doing everything that has been asked of them – BreakingNews.ie (Blame/People Breaking Restrictions)

7. Ireland has developed a “blame culture” around Covid-19 which is now focused on young people, the acting chief medical officer has said. – TheTimes.co.uk (Blame)

8. “We need to think about brunches, lunches, dinner parties and communions too. We have to be able to personalise the message and modify our behaviour,” said Dr Durcan. Dr Durcan also warned about “finger pointing” at young people when the majority had been “remarkably compliant”. (Blame/ OLDER people breaking restrictions)

9. Job insecurity, no ‘real’ college experience, the lack of a social life impacting on mental health; these are just some of the things young people are worried about because of the pandemic. – Irish Examiner (again, clearly made very aware of pandemic repercussions)

10. In the illuminating My World Survey, published by UCD and Jigsaw in November 2019, respondents were asked to name the aspects of their lives that brought them the most stress.

Alongside exams and finance, “the future” was among the top three most salient endorsed stressors for young adults. This bears thinking about. Though it may seem a world away, the Ireland of November 2019 was one in which most indicators of economic growth were strong, where unemployment was low, and where the country was often praised as a post-recession success story. (Pandemic Repercussions)

11. https://youtu.be/JRF7Nmq0sO0

12. https://youtu.be/HloFUdavQ_Y

13. https://youtu.be/nsd0x4CGCOk

14. https://youtu.be/qI6YEfrtJdI

15. https://youtu.be/Z809deXZBwE

Categories
Uncategorized

P3 Legal and Ethical

Lehrer’s Rules

Out of all of Lehrer’s rules, the only one I disagree with is number 9. The rule is “I am not in the entertainment business”. I understand the possible approach he may have taken with this rule – perhaps he was implying that as a journalist, his job was to inform with facts, not mislead by skewing the story to make it more “entertaining”. However, who would read a story if it weren’t for entertainment either way? No matter what the story is, there is always an audience for it, and always a way to grip the reader with your writing skills. Nobody wants to trawl through a story while yawning and scratching their head.

Defamation Defence’s

16. truth

It shall be a defence to a defamation action for the defendant to prove that the statement in respect of which the action was brought is true in all material respects. In a defamation action in respect of a statement containing 2 or more distinct allegations against the plaintiff, the defence of truth shall not fail by reason only of the truth of every allegation not being proved.

Categories
individual project

Self Reflection 1

I’m finding the secondary research beneficial to expanding my knowledge of my topic. Relevant articles, podcasts and videos are easily accessible online, and these are what I have used so far. I plan on visiting my local library to see if I can find books in relation to my research.

While researching initially, I realized I had to take a different approach to my topic. This was due to my original idea being too broad, and I became confused and easily carried away with what I was looking for. I told the tutor that I was considering modifying my approach to the topic, and they agreed that I would be better off doing so.

From now, I think it will take approximately 3 more hours to find all of the information that I am looking for.

I am keeping up to date with the tasks outlined in the project management plan so I do not have to rush to get everything done later on.

In terms of research, I am enjoying the process. At first, I was unsure of what my focus really was and what information I needed to get, which made me feel overwhelmed. It was a case of information overload. However, since adjusting my focus, I have found this much more enjoyable and feel like there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I am interested in my topic, and look forward to my classes and homework where I work on it.

Categories
investigative journalism

P2 Facts are Sacred

1. Casting young people as irresponsible spreaders of coronavirus is “misleading” as research shows they just as compliant as older people, scientists have said. – The Independent (Blame)

2. Covid-19 Cases – September 2020 – CSO15 – 24: 2,00825 – 44: 2,82045-64: 1,976 (Figures/stats)

3. People aged 18-34 have the highest rates of those who are nervous, downhearted, depressed and lonely due to the virus. – CSO (Pandemic repercussions)

4. Yellow Vest Ireland – Up to 2,000 people marched through Dublin City Centre in protest at the wearing of face masks – Video evidence shows no sight of young people apart from children walking with parents or babies in strollers. (Anti-mask)

5. “Evidence suggests that spikes in cases in some countries are being driven in part by younger people letting down their guard during the northern hemisphere summer,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said. (Breaking restrictions)

6. Blaming individuals or specific groups is likely to be counterproductive in the battle to win support and trust for new restrictions. – Stephen Reicher, Social Psychologist, The Guardian (Blame)

7. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths. – CDC.gov (Blame)

8. A 25-year-old who contracts this disease is approximately 250 times less likely to die than an infected 85-year-old, according to the most sophisticated estimates of infection-fatality rates. – The Atlantic (Health aspect)

9. Officials said that young people have been social distancing less often and have more contacts – Euronews (Blame? Breaking restrictions?)

10. Government-backed study reveals under a third of those aged 17-20 hold a driving licence, down from nearly half in the early 1990s – Department of Transport, Oxford and Bristol Universities (meaning young people have to use public transport) (Schools/Public Transport)

11. The overall minimum cost of learning to drive and getting a 10 year driving licence is typically around 690 euro. This does not include any extra lessons outside of the 12-hour mandatory lessons or any extra insurance premiums which would be needed if you were to drive your own car or a family car. – http://www.moneyguideireland.com (Schools/Public transport)

12. Children were about half as likely to catch coronavirus as adults and therefore less likely to pass it on, a review of global studies by University College London (UCL) and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine suggested. (Schools/Public Transport)

13. 132 people aged 15-24 died of the virus (USA – CDC.gov) (Health)

14. Researchers in China found that the most common symptoms among people who were hospitalized with COVID-19 include: – http://www.WebMD.com

  • Fever: 99%
  • Fatigue:70%
  • A dry cough: 59%
  • Loss of appetite: 40%
  • Body aches: 35%
  • Shortness of breath: 31%
  • Mucus or phlegm: 27% (Health)

15. School outbreaks have not been a prominent feature in the COVID-19 pandemic, mostly due to the fact that the majority of children do not develop symptoms when infected with the virus, or develop a very mild form of the disease. – http://www.ecdc.europa.eu (Schools)

16. Specific measures to observe in school settings are increased physical distancing, improved ventilation, regular hand-washing, and the use of masks when feasible. – http://www.ecdc.europa.eu (Schools)

17. Low proportions of antibodies found in children’s blood can be an indication that they are less susceptible to severe infection than adults, and therefore play a less significant role in the spread of the virus. – http://www.ecdc.europa.eu (schools?)

18. When schools close for extended periods, children and young people are deprived of opportunities for growth and development. These disadvantages are disproportionate for under-privileged learners who tend to have fewer educational opportunities outside of school. http://www.ecdc.europa.eu (Schools)

19. Doctors have seen a slew of coronavirus patients in their 30s and 40s suffering from sudden strokes, a condition that is most often seen in senior citizens (the median age for a severe stroke is 74). – http://www.bestlife.com (Health)

20

People at high risk from coronavirus include people who:

  • have had an organ transplant
  • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy (Health)

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization now recommend cloth masks for the general public – http://www.uscf.edu

Categories
individual project

P3 Identifying Stories

Active Story Idea’s:

Media’s impact on mental health.

“Cancel” culture.

Relevant topics no longer swept under the rug.

1. What did the Padlet exercise teach you about creating stories from a given topic?

By using the Padlet exercise, it taught me how to gather all of my thoughts, view them clearly, and figure out if they useful or useless. The visuals on the website are clear and allow you to easily distinguish, with the help of “likes” from others, if your idea is story worthy. By everyone sharing their thoughts, I learned how different people’s opinions on different subjects can vary, but how everyone’s ideas can fit into the same topic even if wildly different.

2. Describe how you approached it differently on the 2 occasions we used it.

The first time using the Padlet exercise, I jotted down every thought that came into my brain when I read the title of the topic. I did not pay too much attention to whether I would be able to obtain enough information on my ideas, and it felt more like a brainstorm than anything. The second time was more analytical. I distinguished between which of my ideas would fit the topic, and which would not. When I found an idea would not fit the topic, I crossed a line through it.

Categories
investigative journalism

P1 Key Journalism Skills

Knowledge, Book, Library, Glasses

Hypothesis – a supposition or proposed explanation made on the basis of limited evidence as a starting point for further investigation (a.k.a. an educated guess).

Research – the systematic investigation into and study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusions.

Objective – not influenced by personal feelings or opinions in considering and representing facts.

Research question – a question that a research project sets out to answer.

Converting Story Ideas

Corona Virus Blame: This is a perfect example of hypothesis in society as of now. People are quick to make the assumption that the rise in Covid-19 cases is near to completely down to the irresponsible actions of young people. Although this may be a portion of the cause, I believe that with further research I will find that older people must also take a look at themselves and the decisions that they make. An aspect of this I am particularly interested in, is what rate of anti-masker’s are young people? I, for one, do not see them partaking in these reckless protests that potentially endanger thousands of lives.

Beauty Standard: If we as a society truly practiceda what we preached, the beauty standard would have been something that was outdated and unheard of. However, we still have a long way to go to truly be inclusive of diversity. I would like to research what is keeping this standard alive, and the effect it has on young people’s mental health. Although I do not pay much attention to this on a personal level, I see first hand the effects it has on people around me. In a world dominated by social media presence, have we became more judgemental than ever before?

Skills I would use in my Journalism

Always make your identity clear – This is important to do to make your name known, for your style to become recognizable and for you to get credit on your work.

Be sympathetic with your quotes – Quotes are a useful way to back up your sources. They credibility to your work, and help the reader perceive the context of your piece better. If phrased correctly, the reader will gain confidence that you know what you’re talking about.

Retracting statements – If you do make a mistake, it’s important to be able to admit when you’re wrong. Spreading false information is something that, as a journalist, needs to be corrected ASAP. The sooner you apologize for this, the sooner your statement will blow over and people will move on.

Local can be easier – When covering a story, locality is the simplest way to go about it: interviews are on your doorstep, primary sources surround you and libraries can be full of useful information. Locality is also less time consuming – for example, it saves you having to travel to get first hand information on a story you were highly invested in.