Categories
investigative journalism

Identifying Material

The main element regarding the style of “Men in Media” is how conversational the video is. Iman Amrani, Guardian journalist, is a very down-to-earth woman, and the tone of the video is very relaxed. She appears in the first few seconds laid back on her couch, in loungewear, drinking from a mug. When the topic of the “ideal man” is put to her, she giggles in confusion, as if to say “Well, how the hell would I know?” Her informal self makes the video an easy watch, and has a great flow to it, despite the topic of the male beauty standard being a serious matter. Amrani is not remotely insensitive to the topic, and has the perfect balance between banter and intellect.

Story Ideas

Beauty Standard

In a world of diversity, why does this still exist? Has this changed in recent times? Have we as a society became better or worse regarding acceptance?

Gender Equality

Have trolls ruined the concept of feminism? Why are men still bashful about being feminists?

Corona Virus Blame

Are older people too quick to put the blame onto us? What are the rates of anti-maskers amongst young people? Do we really have a choice when it comes to “proper” social distancing?

Recession

How will we afford to live? Will we be able to live the lives we had planned to? Will Covid effect us forever?

Categories
individual project

P1 The Democratisation of Media

The impact of citizen journalism on media reliability has certainly increased since 2002, the year I was born. During this time, mobile phones were in no way something that were first choice for photography or videography purposes. Back then, you could buy a brick-style cell that could do no more than call, text or save contacts. Snake may have be preinstalled if you were lucky. If you were really, really lucky, your mobile may have included one back camera with quality as sharp as a WWII film. As there were no touch screens like we have today, people found it frustrating and tedious trying to jump from one application – of few- to another using a keypad. By the time anyone could manage to even open their camera, the event would have already passed. Today, I don’t even have to unlock my phone to have access to a high resolution camera in seconds.

In 2002, social media was practically unheard of. Talk of sites such as Bing began to circulate, but…Facebook? Twitter? Instagram? These are some of the biggest streaming sites for citizen journalism today, but didn’t come to light for several years down the line. This meant that if journalistic pieces were released into the media, it tended to be done through newspapers or tabloids. People who work for these are professionally trained or supervised, so there was a higher reliability in the content they produced, as opposed to today. We as a society absorb social media posts like sponges, and tend to forget that anyone has the power to spread misinformation.

As the internet was not as big of a part of our lives as it is today, many people did not allow it to consume them. In 2002, only 9.1% of the words population were internet users. This figure has shot up eighteen years later to 59%, meaning that 4.57 billion people have the ability to post whatever they see fit. (Kind of terrifying when you think about it.) It is important to remember that if you are engaging in citizen journalism, 4.57 billion people could be reading your work, so factual information is key.

Celebrities have been around for decades, but people who’s lives are dedicated to “social media influencing” have only recently became a vocation. These people are huge voices when it comes to citizen journalism – whatever they post, people eat it up. They can make a post about telling people if they buy a certain brand of tea, they’ll resemble a Victoria Secret model in 28 days. Without a doubt, the brand will be out of stock in 24 hours. People will do no further research into this fact of the “miracle” tea aiding in extreme weight loss, other than one person telling them so. Yes, similar occurrences would have happened back in the day, but with nowhere near the power that social media influencers have due to their usually large followings.

Finally, people’s mindsets have changed since the year I was born in many different aspects. As a generation, we value each other’s words, and are not as quick to judge what other people think as perhaps previous generations would have. Thus, we are more open minded towards letting people express their opinions online, but this becomes a problem when one person’s opinion offends another person’s existence.

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Categories
individual project

The 4 Steps to Getting an Idea

With all great writing’s comes a great responsibility: the ability to gather ideas, and to convert these idea’s into reality. The background of an idea and where it comes from is something I had never quite focused on myself – like a lot of people, I tend to take the concept and run with it. The last thing I want is for the light bulb to blow while wondering where it came from.

According to Kirby Ferguson, a Canadian writer, there is a simple method to where these ideas truly come from. In an intriguing 4 minute video, he explains how his success is achieved by a 4 step technique. This technique includes his ideas being produced through his subconscious mind, with his conscious unknowing of where these ideas came from. The basic elements of this are “Copy, Transform and Combine”. This applies to all of us, whether the results are big or small.

Step one is to create boundaries for what you will explore. Without this, you will become “lost in the wilderness”, as stated by Ferguson. This step is not only the starting point of your idea, but I also feel the most crucial as this is what stops you from being led astray. Set a goal for which you want to find out more.

Step two is to consume everything you can with boundaries. This includes the books you read, the movies you watch, the life you experience. Your environment effects the way you think, whether you realize this or not. This is a great way to gain more knowledge about your topic.

Step three is to digest your research. This in order to make sure you understand it fully. Study the materials, organize them, arrange them into a narrative, group things together and make a map of what you’ve learnt. With these three tools, you have already created the body of your idea.

Finally, with step 4, drop it. Go outside, relax and move on. Gradually, an idea will reach you and you will be able to produce it.

I feel that this technique of creating an idea is near enough to foolproof, once executed correctly. If it fails, all you can do is try again. Pushing yourself to the max is key, and once you’ve practised this plan enough ideas will come to you freely.

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Categories
Uncategorized

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Categories
Uncategorized

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Categories
Uncategorized

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.